There is no structured method for benchmarking the human element in safety.

In 1968, JD Power and Associates revolutionized automotive quality using a simple idea from Deming:  Anything measured improves.

Quality has truly come a long way in global manufacturing as a result. But what about Safety?

Sadly, the way most companies and associations measure safety is largely through lagging indicators…e.g. the “failure rate” of the process.   Associations typically honor their members who, once again, have achieved low injury and fatality rates. They drive safety by looking in the rear-view mirror. But great safety metrics don’t necessarily mean you have a great safety culture.

Deepwater Horizon celebrated 7 years without a single injury on the morning of the tragic explosion.

Is there a better way? Yes.

Using GSI software tools, your organization can begin to measure culture and leadership behaviors that drive excellence in lagging metrics. You can easily determine cause and effect, and drill into the leading factors that really make a difference. And your data is your data, kept anonymous and confidential. Not only will you learn your cultural strengths, but you’ll identify areas for improvement.

And last, but not least, you’ll be able to benchmark other firms both inside and outside of your industry to gain valuable insights for improvement. GSI Safety Challenges can be setup internally in your company, a captive insurance group, or within the association you support. Our mission is to find and understand the best, and share it with the rest. Long overdue, don’t you think?

To learn more, just click this link for a short 8 minute video….

https://greenbeanworkshop.com/?c=MjQ5NTY1NDIyNC1nYQ

Global Safety Institute will benchmark safety across member companies worldwide and assist those companies in implementing the best practices to reduce accidents and foster safe behaviors.

We often measure what is easy to measure but may not be that important, because often times the things that are important are hard to measure. The Tyranny of Metrics, J. Muller